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Edith Schulhofer (1900 - 2001)

 

Pioneering Contributions

 

Those who knew Edith Schulhofer attest to her outstanding contributions to the profession of social work through her writing, teaching, and practice at Tulane University School of Social Work.  A refugee from Nazi Germany, after the war Schulhofer prepared social therapists in the treatment of holocaust survivors in France. While at Tulane, her focus was child therapy, and she did significant work in the development of new theories.  Schulhofer was well known to the lay community as well as to her colleagues in social work and in related professions for her activism and advising, characterized by unbounded energy, her magnetic personality, and professional wisdom.

 

Career Highlights

 

Schulhofer spent many years teaching at Tulane University in New Orleans.  She retired from Tulane in the 1970’s but stayed involved with the community and taught until shortly before her death.  Prior to her arrival at Tulane, she worked at the Jewish Board of Guardians in New York City as a psychiatric social worker, then returned to France to teach at the Paul Baerwald School of Social Work.

 

Biographic Data

 

Born in Nurnberg, Germany in 1900, Shulhofer studied law at the University of Munich and became the first female lawyer in Nurnberg October 28 1928. She realized her and her family's existence in Nazi Germany was threatened as early as 1933. After the loss of her right to practice, fleeing the Nazis, she emigrated to Lyons, France, where she worked as an educator.  Having saved her mother from the holocaust in 1939, she managed to emigrate to the USA where she earned her MSW at Columbia University, graduating in 1943. After the war ended, she returned to France to work with holocaust survivors until 1950.

 

Significant Achievements and Awards

 

1974: recipient of the Hannah G. Solomon Award (award of the National Council of Jewish Women)

1968: recipient of the George S. Freeman Award by the Louisiana Conference on Social Welfare for her outstanding contribution to social welfare in Louisiana.

After her retirement, the New School of Social Research in New Orleans established a stipend fund in her name.

 

Significant Publications

 

Marcus, I.M., Wilson, W., Kraft, I., Swander, D., Southerland, F., & Schulhorer, E. (1960). An Interdisciplinary Approach to Accident Patterns in Children.

 

Sources

 

http://www.rijo.homepage.t-online.de/pdf/DE_NU_JU_schulh.pdf

 

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