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Doris Siegel (1914-1971)

Doris Siegel concentrated her pioneering efforts in the areas of social work administration, education, and public health. Siegel was deeply involved and committed to bridging the gap between health care administration and the general public.

After completing her bachelor's and master's degrees at Simmons College in 1935 and 1936 respectively, Siegel began her social work career as a caseworker and supervisor at Beth Israel Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. From 1940 to 1945 Siegel was the director of the Social Service Department at Montefiore Hospital in Pennsylvania. She was instrumental in the reorganization of the social service department into a professional service which benefitted the community and social work students in training programs.

In 1945, Siegel moved to Washington, DC and continued her career as a medical social consultant and educational consultant at the Children's Bureau of the Department of Health, Education and Welfare until 1954. From 1954 until her death, Siegel was the director of the Social Service Department at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. She concentrated her efforts in the areas of staff and program development and participation in educational programs for social work students.

Siegel taught several courses at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine from 1968 to 1971. In addition, she conducted teaching workshops and training institutes for the staff at the State Health Department, students at schools of social work, and educational activities sponsored by the professional associations.

Siegel was a member of several professional associations and committees including the New York Heart Association, the National Association of Social Workers, the Editorial Advisory Panel of the Journal of Education for Social Work, and the American Public Health Association. She was the recipient of the Simmons College Alumnae Achievement Award in 1970 and received an Honorable Mention Award from the National Conference of Jewish Communal Service in 1961.

She has published several articles which have appeared in The Mount Sinai Journal of Medicine, the Journal of American Geriatrics Society, and Social Work.

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